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Prosecutors in the case of David Endresen, the 64-year-old Seward man accused of amassing a collection of child pornography, have put together a plea deal that would see most of the charges against Endresen dropped, according to documents filed in the Third District Superior Court.

Endresen was charged with 19 counts of possession of child pornography, a felony, after officers with the Seward Police Department searched his home, allegedly seizing over a dozen boxes of evidence.

The plea agreement would see all but one of those counts dropped, in exchange for Endresen’s pleading guilty and accepting an eight-year sentence, with six years suspended. The arrangement would require a minimum two years of incarceration, followed by ten years’ probation.

Neither Endresen nor his attorney have yet signed the agreement.

The plea agreement includes a narrative account of the case, which began with tips from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

Investigators at the Anchorage Police Department, Alaska’s lead agency with a national task force on internet crimes against children, connected an IP address reported by the NCMEC to an address on Seward’s Bear Drive, according to the document.

Officers with the Seward Police Department connected the address to Endresen and subsequently obtained a search warrant for the home, which Endresen shared with a roommate. The roommate allegedly shared a kitchen and bathroom with Endresen, but the two had separate living areas.

A search of Endresen’s part of the home allegedly revealed what the plea agreement calls “significant quantities of printed child pornography” posted on the walls and filed in binders.

The search team included officers from the Seward Police Department, Anchorage Cyber Crimes Unit, Alaska State Troopers Technical Crime Unit and Alaska State Troopers E Detachment, according to a press release from the Seward Police Department.

The officers reportedly seized a laptop, cell phone and more than 20 boxes of printed material.

For imagery to qualify as child pornography, it must depict a minor engaged in conduct outlined in Alaska’s statute on unlawful exploitation of minors.