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News

The search for Seward’s next city manager is entering its final stages. The City Council on Wednesday narrowed the field to just two candidates, inviting Scott Meszaros and Erin Reinders to come to Seward for face-to-face interviews.

A man accused of brutally beating his girlfriend late last year faces trial for a lengthy list of felonies including attempted murder. On Dec. 15, Seward police interrupted the alleged assault after a 911 call led them to the apartment that Wilson Vincente Carlos, 31, shared with a woman he …

Preliminary results are in for Seward’s Referendum No. 1, which would opt the city back into the state Public Employment Relations Act. The results are inconclusive and will be decided when absentee ballots are counted by the canvass board on Thursday.

The consultant hired to recruit Seward’s next city manager has prepared video interviews with the remaining candidates, which can be viewed online. Videos are available from three of the four candidates left after the council’s first reading of applications.

Sports/Outdoors

Seward got off to a hot start by steamrolling Houston high school in round one of the 2019 3-A Regional Basketball Championship. Round two was played against Anchorage Christian School, a rematch from the previous week that ended with Seward on the wrong side of the scoreboard. After that lo…

This was the third time Seward and Kenai crossed paths this season, but this time it would be for more than bragging rights. Third place for the regionals tournament was on the line.

Schools

Students at Seward High School have been using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) to map rivers and creeks in order to analyze flood-prone areas in our community. The Bear Creek Flood Board uses these maps to mitigate areas in need of flood prevention.

Seward got off to a hot start by steamrolling Houston high school in round one of the 2019 3-A Regional Basketball Championship. Round two was played against Anchorage Christian School, a rematch from the previous week that ended with Seward on the wrong side of the scoreboard. After that lo…

Births

Jeff Dillon and Laura Sturtz are pleased to announce the birth of triplets Aurora Kathleen, Heath Spencer and Alder Clark Sturtz-Dillon, born Aug. 7 at Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage. At birth, Aurora and Heath each weighed 5 pounds and Alder weighed 4 pounds. The triplets are…

Obituaries

Donald Lynch of Seward passed away January 18, 2019, surrounded by his family. A full obituary will follow at a later date. There will be a po…

Ryan Matthew Lewis (a.k.a. Lewi) 37, died February 24, 2019 in an accident at home. Born and raised in Seward, Lewi was very social and loved …

Lifelong Alaskan Debra Ann (Kane) Petersen, 65, passed away from sudden and unexpected heart failure, February 24, 2019, in Palm Springs, Cali…

Features

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As I was driving down the highway, I saw a shaggy, gray-black canine cruising along on the snowpack, right next to the road. Could it be one of the hardest animals to spot in Alaska, a wolf?

Opinion

March 24, 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the day Exxon Valdez fetched up on Bligh Reef and spilled almost 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska. Like most Alaskans and Americans, the disaster shocked and angered me. The massive harm to the marine ecosystems of Prince William Sound, deaths of thousands of seabirds, marine mammals and other wildlife, devastation of fisheries I knew Alaskan fishermen and families depended upon, and the failures of multiple organizations and individuals to prevent such an event was a gut wrenching, transformative experience. Three decades on, the only real good to come from the spill were hard-learned lessons that improved how marine oil transportation is conducted and regulated in Alaska and globally.